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REMM Announces Two New Major Updates

The US Department of Health and Human Services’ Radiation Emergency Medical Management (REMM) team announced two major updates:

A new version of Mobile REMM (Version 2.1.1) was released in the App Store and Google Play Store in August 2017. Updates include:

  1. Easier input of date,time and lymphocyte count in “Dose Estimator” and “Scarce Resources” Tools.
  2. Results of Dose Estimator and Scarce Resources Triage Tool easily captured on single screen.
  3. Zooming in and out enabled, especially helpful on algorithm pages.
  4. Landscape view now enabled for easier reading, especially helpful on algorithm pages.
  5. Design improvements for clearer fonts and better colors.
  6. Updated Emergency Contacts information for government resources.
  7. Updated links to REMM web site.
  8. Clearer presentation of medical disclaimers.

Now available on the REMM website are the updated Template/Prototype for Adult Hospital Orders During a Radiation Incident and new Template/Prototype for Pediatric Hospital Orders during a Radiation Incident.

Submit an Abstract for the 28th National Radiological Emergency Preparedness Conference, Inc.

The 28th National Radiological Emergency Preparedness (NREP ) Conference is a forum that brings together professionals in the field of radiological emergency preparedness for information sharing and problem solving. The NREP Conference is now accepting abstracts of proposed trainings, workshops, and general sessions that are closely related to radiological emergency preparedness. Groups or individuals within emergency response organizations throughout the country and abroad are welcome to share their innovative radiological response ideas or implemented processes. Abstracts are being accepted until October 1, 2017.

US Cities Are Not Medically Prepared for A Nuclear Detonation

The United States is not prepared to deal with an attack by a terrorist group using an improvised nuclear device, the author says. It should get prepared, because the risk is real even if the probability is low, and doing so could save a great many lives. The author explores the potential impact of a 10–15-kt improvised nuclear device set off in New York City. The initial blast would kill between 75,000 and 100,000 people in seconds. Another 100,000–200,000 people would be injured, many of them dying within weeks or months, some with burns, others with impact injuries, and some with acute radiation syndrome. The demands on the medical system would be vast and overwhelming, all the more so because the bomb would have destroyed much of the capacity to respond. Current planning efforts are not sufficient to manage the carnage.

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